Before-After: Full Bleed Image

Many people use images in their slide presentations that are smaller than the size of the slide. Typically the images are placed underneath or away from whatever text is on the slide.

To convey your message in a much more powerful way, you can use a full bleed image. “Full bleed” means making the image bleed off the sides of the slide, taking up the whole space of the slide. Then you just put your text, making sure it has enough contrast, on top of the image as can be seen in the before and after below.

Before:

Slide With Image Before Full Bleed

After:

Slide With Full Bleed Image

Image Source: stadje

Insert Video from Web – PowerPoint 2010

Just a quick look at how you can insert a video into your slide presentation from the Web. In this example I will use YouTube.

First you must find the video you want to insert into your presentation so I went to YouTube and picked a random video I found. (You can click on the image to see a bigger version.)

Screenshot of YouTube video

Copy the embed code as highlighted in red in the screenshot above.

Back in PowerPoint, find the slide you want the video inserted on and go to the Insert tab and click on Video. Choose Video from Web site….

Insert Video in PowerPoint

A new window will pop-up. Past the copied embed code and click insert.

Insert or Paste Embed Code

The video will show up on the slide.

Video Inserted on Slide

Before-After: Increase Slide Real Estate

There is limited real estate on each slide and it is dumb to waste much of that space by using a background (or a theme with a background) that has background elements that reduces the effective area of the slide.

The effective area is the area that can be used for actual content. It is better to just use a simple background with perhaps just a single color or a subtle gradient.

The background elements not only reduce the effective space but can also be distracting to the audience and draw attention away from the real message. Background elements should only be used if the background elements serve an important purpose for conveying your message. That they are an integral part of your design strategy.

Before:

Before Slide
Before:

After:

After Slide
After:

Using Custom Shapes in PowerPoint 2010

Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 has some cool custom shapes functions that are not visible in the ribbon by default but can be added.

To add or customize the ribbon go to “File > Options”. In the pop-up window on the left choose “Customize Ribbon”.

Then you must create a custom group to add the new functions to. On the bottom right side click on “New Group” while having the “Home” selected in the “Main Tabs” window. A new group will be added. You can rename it if you like.

In the middle drop down menu choose “Commands Not in Ribbon”. Then scroll down and find “Shape Combine”, “Shape Intersect”, “Shape Subtract” and “Shape Union”. Select each one of them and click “Add>>”. Click “OK”.

Customize Ribbon Option Window

You should now have a new group in the Ribbon under the Home tab.

Let us now look at what each of those do. All of these 4 functions do something to 2 or more shapes so we need to have at least 2 shapes drawn on the slide. We will use the same 2 shapes to test each of the 4 functions; a square and a circle. The shape that is on top (most forward) will be secondary shape. I will show the function selected in the ribbon above each result below.

One Red Circle and One Blue Square

1. Shape Combine

Combined Shapes

2. Shape Intersect

Intersect Ribbon Function

Intersect Shapes

3. Shape Subtract

Subtract Ribbon Function

Subtract Shapes

4 Shape Union

Union Ribbon Function

Union Shapes

Let me know about any cool shapes you come up with.

SlideBlog Re-Evaluation Update

I have spent some time trying to figure out what I want to do with SlideBlog and have concluded that the new goal is about Slide Awareness. I hope to expand the content on SlideBlog in the near future to be a real resource for Presentations, Presentation Design and Public Speaking/Presenting.

The goal of SlideBlog is:

To create a movement of Slide Aware people by providing examples, ideas, inspiration, knowledge, and education.

I will keep my own goal for 2010 of learning a new dish every week (provided I am in my kitchen) and document it with a slideshow so you can expect to see a weekly SlideRecipe on SlideBlog. I will also continue with SlideBlog Tips & Tricks and will probably post those on Tuesdays.

As I have learned so much more about presentations I have come to understand the great power and impact a great presentation can have but also how much effort needs to be put into making a great presentation. This is why I have decided that it is too ambitious to post a SlideBlog every week as the result is typically not of the quality a presentation/slideshow deserves, so I have decided to post a SlideBlog only once a month. Hopefully this will allow me to take the necessary time to really create great slideshows to share with you. I will be posting SlideBlog on Fridays.

I hope to introduce some new categories in the near future to provide you with more resources, ideas, examples, and knowledge so you can make great presentations and become Slide Aware.

Thanks,

Kristian

Re-Evaluating SlideBlog

Dear All,

Since the inception of this blog about 6 months ago I have become increasingly familiar with the world of presentations, presentation design and public speaking. My passion for this has only grown and my respect for it has grown the same. SlideBlog started out as an experiment combining slideshows with a blog and I have been trying to post a new SlideBlog (post) every week. As I have come to learn so much more about presentations/slides I have come to realize that it is time to re-evaluate SlideBlog, its content and its purpose, so I will not be posting a new SlideBlog today.

I hope to have the new strategy for SlideBlog ironed out by next week and back with updates and information about the future of SlideBlog and what you can expect to see and get from it. I thank you for your interest in SlideBlog and hope to see you all again next week.

Thanks,

Kristian Salvesen